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Americans Are Turning To Social Media For Movie Reviews Than Professional Critics, Study Finds

Researchers have established that Americans are more likely to follow random social media users’ recommendations of TV shows rather than professional movie critics. 

Americans are not following professional movie critics 

A study assessing recommendation pop-culture habits of around 2,000 residents found that only 9% of Americans turn to critics for recommendations on what they read, watch and pally. In contrast, around 18% of Americans will rather believe the opinion of a random social media commenter. Also, 47% of respondents indicated that they prefer close friends’ opinions, while 44% indicated they follow the opinions of family members rather than professional critics.

Interestingly, five in six people will follow other people’s online reviews for TV shows. The researchers also established that more people are turning to user-driven spaces such as Amazon (44%) and YouTube (50%) over professional review aggregators such as Metacritic (6%) and Rotten Tomatoes (24%). 

OnePoll conducted the study on behalf of Element Electronic, and researchers also revealed that around 68% of Americans would check a new title within weeks of recommendation. However, most respondents indicated that those sitting to watch a movie with friends should be wary of their behaviour during screening. 

Men more likely to follow a friend’s movie recommendation 

One respondent indicated that they detest when a friend starts pointing things out or giving hints as much as they like sharing their experience. Another respondent indicated that they prefer someone who will answer questions rather than someone giving the whole plot away. 

The survey found that men are more likely to overlook the entertainment faux pas, with 47% indicating they enjoy watching a friend’s preferred movie or TV show with them while only 39% of women will prefer the same. 

However, the researchers pointed out that 35% of the respondents said that the more they are told they will enjoy a movie, the less likely they will watch it. Equally, 15% of the respondents admitted that they have agreed to watch a movie recommended by a friend so that the friend can leave them alone. 

Written by Payal Gupta

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